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White House says ‘Americans should feel safe going to the polls’

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White House press secretary Karine Jean-Pierre said Monday that there are no “specific and credible” election threats and that all Americans “should feel safe going to the polls” on Tuesday.

He also reminded voters that the results may not be known immediately. The results of the 2020 election were not known until almost two weeks after that election.

“Police have advised us that there are no specific credible threats identified at this time. The president has been briefed on the threat environment,” he said at his daily briefing.

“Americans should feel safe going to the polls,” he said.

He also asked for patience when it came to finding out which party won control of the House and Senate.

“In modern elections, more and more early voting ballots are being cast,” he said, noting that “many states don’t start counting those ballots until after the polls close on Nov. 8.”

‘We may not know all the election winners for a few days. It takes time to count all legitimate ballots in a legal and orderly manner. That’s how this is supposed to work. And it’s important that we all be patient while the votes are being counted.’

White House press secretary Karine Jean-Pierre said there are no “specific and credible” electoral threats and that all Americans “should feel safe going to the polls.”

Fears of violence spread after Nancy Pelosi’s husband, Paul, was attacked in his San Francisco home last week by a man looking for the speaker. She was not at home at the time.

The Justice Department is sending monitors to 24 states to make sure federal voting laws are put forward in Tuesday’s election.

They will enforce the Voting Rights Act, along with the National Voter Registration Act and other statutes, as some voting rights groups have raised concerns that there could be intimidation at the polls.

But elections also face non-physical threats, including disinformation campaigns and allegations of voter fraud.

“People should have confidence in their electoral system,” said Jean-Pierre.

Conspiracy theories about the security of electoral systems were pushed by supporters of Donald Trump after his 2020 loss and have continued to take hold in the midterm elections.

Russia has reactivated its trolls and bots ahead of the contest on November 8. And the FBI has issued warnings about disinformation threats.

Voters line up outside the Old Sedgwick County Courthouse in downtown Wichita, Kansas, on Monday, the last day of early voting in the state.

Voters line up outside the Old Sedgwick County Courthouse in downtown Wichita, Kansas, on Monday, the last day of early voting in the state.

Voters line up outside the Old Sedgwick County Courthouse in downtown Wichita, Kansas, on Monday, the last day of early voting in the state.

New York voters participate in early voting

New York voters participate in early voting

New York voters participate in early voting

Voters line up in Ohio to vote early ahead of Tuesday's midterm elections

Voters line up in Ohio to vote early ahead of Tuesday's midterm elections

Voters line up in Ohio to vote early ahead of Tuesday’s midterm elections

When will the results of the midterm exams be available? It could take just a few hours or nearly a MONTH for control of Congress to be known… but beware of red and blue ‘mirage states’ that appear decided before they really are.

Although Election Day is only a few days away, it can take up to a month for Americans to find out which party will have control of the US Congress.

All 435 seats in the US House of Representatives are up for grabs on Tuesday, as are all 35 US Senate seats and all 36 governorships.

Republicans would need five seats to gain a majority in the House and just one to control the Senate. Nonpartisan election forecasters and polling suggest Republicans have a strong chance of winning a House majority, with control of the Senate likely to be tighter as voters say they are more worried about the economy.

A massive wave of Republican support could lead to declarations of victory hours after the polls close.

But with dozens of races expected to be close and battleground states like Pennsylvania already warning it could take days to count each ballot, experts say there’s a good chance Americans will go to bed on election night not knowing. who won.

“When it comes to the results, we need to stop talking about Election Day and think about Election Week instead,” said Nathan Gonzales, who publishes the nonpartisan Inside Elections newsletter.

Earlier vote counts will be skewed by how quickly states count mail-in ballots, with some states reporting mail-in ballot results earlier, which could make it look like Democrats have the upper hand in the state. .

Earlier vote counts will be skewed by how quickly states count mail-in ballots, with some states reporting mail-in ballot results earlier, which could make it look like Democrats have the upper hand in the state. .

Earlier vote counts will be skewed by how quickly states count mail-in ballots, with some states reporting mail-in ballot results earlier, which could make it look like Democrats have the upper hand in the state. .

Watch out for red and blue ‘mirage’ states

Earlier vote counts will be skewed by how quickly states count mail-in ballots.

Because Democrats vote by mail more often than Republicans, states that allow officials to get an early jump on counting mail-in ballots could report big Democratic advantages early on that evaporate as counters of votes work through stacks of Republican-leaning ballots that were cast on Election Day.

In these ‘blue mirage’ states, like Florida and North Carolina, election officials can remove mail-in ballots from their envelopes before Election Day and load them into vote-counting machines, allowing for a quick count. .

But states like Pennsylvania and Wisconsin don’t allow officials to open envelopes until Election Day, leading to a possible “red mirage” in which Republican-leaning Election Day ballots are reported earlier and many of Democratic-leaning ballots are counted later.

Experts like Joe Lenski, co-founder of Edison Research, which will track hundreds of races on Nov. 8, said he will keep an eye on the mix of different types of ballots each state is counting overnight.

Blue mirage, red mirage, whatever. You just have to look at what types of votes are being reported to know where you are in that state,” Lenski said.

So when will we know when races are won?

The first wave of vote counts is expected on the East Coast between 7 pm and 8 pm ET. An early indication of Republican success could come if races expected to be close, such as Virginia’s 7th congressional district (where Republican Liz Cheney endorsed a Democratic candidate) or a contentious US Senate seat in North Carolina, happen to be Democrats. routes

Around 10 p.m. Center for Politics at the University of Virginia.

If the House race still looks close as vote counts begin to come in from the West Coast, where there could be more than a dozen close House races, it could be days before House control is known. camera, experts said.

It typically takes weeks for California to count all of its ballots, in part because it counts ballots postmarked by Election Day, even if they arrive days later. Nevada and Washington state also allow late ballots if they are postmarked by Nov. 8, slowing the march toward final results.

“If the House is really on edge, that would matter,” Kondik said.

It may take longer, perhaps weeks more, to figure out which party will control the Senate, with close races in Pennsylvania, Arizona and Georgia likely to determine final control.

And if the Georgia Senate race is as close as expected and no candidate receives more than 50 percent of the vote, a runoff would be scheduled for Dec. 6, possibly leaving control of the chamber in the limbo until then.