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Sentencing of Theranos CEO, Elizabeth Holmes, is POSTPONED after judge orders questioning of star witness

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The sentencing of Theranos CEO, Elizabeth Holmes, has been postponed after a judge ordered the questioning of the prosecutor’s key witness, who alleged the government was trying to make everyone look “bad” in the trial.

U.S. District Judge Edward Davila agreed to hold a new hearing on Oct. 17 after Holmes’ former lab director, Adam Rosendorff, reportedly admitted that his testimony against her had been distorted by prosecutors after he showed up unannounced at her home in August. .

Holmes, 38, could face up to 20 years in prison after being convicted of conspiracy and telefraud. She was found guilty on four of the 11 counts in January and is currently free from $500,000 bail pending the sentencing of the mother of one.

Court documents previously said Rosendorff told Holmes that “he tried to answer questions honestly at Ms Holmes’ trial, but the government was trying to make everyone look bad.”

Holmes filed the motion in the San Jose District Court, alleging the key witness regretted the role he played in her conviction for investor fraud and conspiracy regarding her failed blood test.

Her lawyers filed for a new trial last month.

Elizabeth Holmes, 38, faces up to 20 years in prison after being convicted of conspiracy and wire fraud

Elizabeth Holmes, 38, faces up to 20 years in prison after being convicted of conspiracy and wire fraud

Holmes' former lab director, Adam Rosendorff, has reportedly admitted that his testimony against her was distorted by prosecutors after he showed up unannounced at her home in August.

Holmes' former lab director, Adam Rosendorff, has reportedly admitted that his testimony against her was distorted by prosecutors after he showed up unannounced at her home in August.

Holmes’ former lab director, Adam Rosendorff, has reportedly admitted that his testimony against her was distorted by prosecutors after he showed up unannounced at her home in August.

Holmes is a rare example of a tech executive on the record of a company going up in flames, in an industry littered with the carcasses of money-losing companies that once promised untold riches

Holmes is a rare example of a tech executive on the record of a company going up in flames, in an industry littered with the carcasses of money-losing companies that once promised untold riches

Holmes is a rare example of a tech executive on the record of a company going up in flames, in an industry littered with the carcasses of money-losing companies that once promised untold riches

Davila postponed the sentencing, saying on Monday: “The charge is the possibility that the government has engaged in misconduct. The court takes that seriously.’

In September, Holmes’ partner William Evans said of Rosendorff in an exhibit with the court: “He said he felt guilty, it looked like he was in pain.

“He said that when he was called as a witness, he tried to answer the questions honestly, but the prosecutors were trying to make everyone look bad (in the company).”

Evans said he had sent Rosendorff away from the house he shares with Holmes and their young son, and told Rosendorff that Holmes couldn’t talk to him.

“He said he thought it would heal both himself and Elizabeth to talk,” Evans said.

Rosendorff joined Theranos in April 2013 as lab director and told the judges that he left in November 2014 due to doubts about the company’s priorities, according to CNN Business.

At the trial, Rosendorff testified, “I felt pressured to vouch for tests I was not confident in. I came to believe that the company believed more in PR and fundraising than in patient care.”

Holmes was convicted of defrauding investors in her $9 billion startup Theranos, which made wild claims of revolutionizing medical testing while relying on existing technology from other vendors.

At the trial, Rosendorff testified that he felt it necessary to raise “the alarm bells” and added that he felt it was “important that Elizabeth was aware of these issues as the company’s chief executive.”

At trial, Holmes’ lawyers claimed she was the innocent pawn of her manipulative and violent lover and business partner Ramesh “Sunny” Balwani, he fervently claims.

In July, Balwani was found guilty of all 12 felonies for defrauding both Theranos investors and the patients who relied on the company’s wildly unreliable blood tests that could have endangered their health.

U.S. District Judge Edward Davila agreed to hold a new hearing on Oct. 17 after Holmes' former laboratory director, Adam Rosendorff, reportedly admitted his testimony against her had been distorted by prosecutors after he was unannounced at her home in August. appeared

U.S. District Judge Edward Davila agreed to hold a new hearing on Oct. 17 after Holmes' former laboratory director, Adam Rosendorff, reportedly admitted his testimony against her had been distorted by prosecutors after he was unannounced at her home in August. appeared

U.S. District Judge Edward Davila agreed to hold a new hearing on Oct. 17 after Holmes’ former laboratory director, Adam Rosendorff, reportedly admitted his testimony against her had been distorted by prosecutors after he was unannounced at her home in August. appeared

Former CEO of Theranos, Elizabeth Holmes, center, and her mother, Noel Holmes, left, arrive in federal court in San Jose on September 1, 2022

Former CEO of Theranos, Elizabeth Holmes, center, and her mother, Noel Holmes, left, arrive in federal court in San Jose on September 1, 2022

Former CEO of Theranos, Elizabeth Holmes, center, and her mother, Noel Holmes, left, arrive in federal court in San Jose on September 1, 2022

Balwani, 57, also faces up to 20 years in prison and is free from $750,000 bail pending his November 15 hearing.

Holmes is a rare example of a tech executive being chronicled over a company going up in flames, in an industry littered with the carcasses of money-losing companies that once promised untold riches.

Her case shone a spotlight on the blurred line between the hustle and bustle that characterizes the industry and outright criminal dishonesty.

Holmes had vowed to revolutionize health diagnostics with self-service machines that could run a battery of tests on just a few drops of blood, a vision that attracted high profile backers and made her a billionaire on paper at age 30.

She was hailed as the next tech visionary on magazine covers and collected mountains of money from investors, but everything came crashing down after the Wall Street Journal report revealed the machines weren’t working as promised.

Jurors found her guilty of four counts of defrauding investors.

But the jury also acquitted her of four charges and was unable to rule on three others.