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Mice plague hits central Queensland with locals attacked in their sleep

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Mice tease back with vengeance as starving rodents attack horrified Australian farmers and settle in their hair as they SLEEP

  • Mouse infestation becomes a serious problem in the Queensland region of North Burnett
  • Resident outside the Gayndah suburb of North Burnett recently caught 1,000 mice
  • Mild winter and wet summer had provided perfect conditions for mouse infestation

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Australian farmers and rural residents are inundated by yet another mouse infestation with a tidal wave of rodents engulfing their homes.

Locals in North Burnett, in central Queensland, are even bitten in their sleep as rodents infest their shops at night.

Susie Capewell, who lives outside the town of Gayndah, said she caught nearly 1,000 mice in the past two weeks.

There have been reports of local residents in the Queensland area of ​​North Burnett being bitten in their sleep and of rodents infesting shops at night (Pictured: Mice plague across Queensland)

There have been reports of local residents in the Queensland area of ​​North Burnett being bitten in their sleep and of rodents infesting shops at night (Pictured: Mice plague across Queensland)

“We usually get them at night… the more traps you have, the more you get,” she told ABC.

Ms Capewell said locals were tired of having the pesky rodents in their homes.

“I spoke to a few people in town, one person who was bitten on his hand in bed, they were chewing his hand,” she said.

“People have had them in their hair and in their beds at night.”

Brett Jordan, owner of Norco Rural Stores in Gayndah, said the plague started several months ago, but the number of mice has increased in recent days.

“We’ve probably lost about $11,000 in feed this month… they’re destroying it overnight,” he said.

Ms Capewell also said locals are tired of having the pesky rodents in their homes (Pictured: Residents who use traps to catch mice)

Ms Capewell also said locals are tired of having the pesky rodents in their homes (Pictured: Residents who use traps to catch mice)

Ms Capewell also said locals are tired of having the pesky rodents in their homes (Pictured: Residents who use traps to catch mice)

“We’re not going to order any more food because we lose it just as quickly as we get it.”

Gayndah vet Dr Nathan Hitchcock said last year’s mild winter, coupled with a wet summer, allowed long grass to grow and created the perfect conditions for a mouse infestation.

“Two mice can become 12 mice in 20 days … so your population explosion can be quite dramatic,” he said.

It’s understood locals have approached the North Burnett Regional Council about what they can do to resolve this issue, but they have not yet received a response.