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Justin Trudeau deletes FALSE tweet that 15,000 protesters have been sentenced to death in Iran

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Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has deleted a tweet falsely claiming that 15,000 protesters in Iran have been sentenced to death.

The world leader tweeted late Monday night: “Canada denounces the Iranian regime’s barbaric decision to impose the death penalty on nearly 15,000 protesters.

“These brave Iranians fought for their human rights – and we remain united to support them, and united against the regime’s horrific actions.”

Iranian officials are beginning to condemn thousands of protesters who have taken to the streets in recent months after a 22-year-old Kurdish woman died in custody after allegedly violating the country’s strict dress code for women.

Last week, a photo circulated on Instagram of a woman holding an Iranian flag with red paint on her face that read “Iran sentences 15,000 protesters to death as a “hard lesson” for all rebels.”

The post was widely shared by celebrities such as Sophie Turner and Viola Davis.

But so far only one person has been officially sentenced to death for his participation in the protests.

Instagram has since tagged the post as “false information,” saying, “Independent fact-checkers say this information is factually based on nothing.” It has since been removed.

Trudeau later deleted the tweet spreading the false information just 12 hours after he first posted it.

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has deleted a tweet falsely claiming that 15,000 protesters in Iran have been sentenced to death. He is pictured here in Bangkok on Thursday

The tweet (pictured) was deleted just 12 hours after Trudeau first posted it

It came after a photo was widely circulated on Instagram claiming that “Iran is condemning 15,000 protesters to death as a "hard lesson" for all rebels.'  The social media platform later tagged the post as 'false information'

It came after a photo was widely circulated on Instagram claiming that “Iran is condemning 15,000 protesters to death as a "hard lesson" for all rebels.'  The social media platform later tagged the post as 'false information'

It came after a photo was widely circulated on Instagram claiming that “Iran sentences 15,000 protesters to death as a “hard lesson” for all rebels.” The social media platform later tagged the post as ‘false information’

The post was informed by the initial reporting which was incomplete and lacked necessary context. That’s why it has since been removed,” a Canadian government spokesman said CNN.

“It was based on reports of serious concerns from international human rights lawyers who warned of possible future punishments, including the death penalty imposed on thousands of Iranian protesters already detained by the regime.”

He added: “We must not lose sight of the fact that one person has already been sentenced to death and that Iranian parliamentarians must not call for death sentences to be imposed.

“Dozens of protesters have already been killed by the regime’s security forces,” the spokesman noted.

Iran has been embroiled in mass protests since Mahsa Amini, a 22-year-old woman, was arrested on September 13 by the country's death police in Tehran for allegedly not wearing her hijab properly under Islamic law.

Iran has been embroiled in mass protests since Mahsa Amini, a 22-year-old woman, was arrested on September 13 by the country's death police in Tehran for allegedly not wearing her hijab properly under Islamic law.

Iran has been embroiled in mass protests since Mahsa Amini, a 22-year-old woman, was arrested on September 13 by the country’s death police in Tehran for allegedly not wearing her hijab properly under Islamic law.

Thousands of protesters have been arrested in recent months for their involvement

Thousands of protesters have been arrested in recent months for their involvement

Thousands of protesters have been arrested in recent months for their involvement

The uprising, by irate Iranians from all walks of life, represents one of the boldest challenges to the Church leadership since the 1979 revolution

The uprising, by irate Iranians from all walks of life, represents one of the boldest challenges to the Church leadership since the 1979 revolution

The uprising, by irate Iranians from all walks of life, represents one of the boldest challenges to the Church leadership since the 1979 revolution

Iran has been embroiled in mass protests since Mahsa Amini, a 22-year-old woman, died in custody after being arrested by the country’s death police in Tehran on September 13 for allegedly not wearing her hijab properly under Islamic law.

Reports soon emerged of officers hitting her on the head with a baton, but authorities insisted she had suffered a heart attack – releasing footage of Amini collapsing at a police station.

The first protests started after Amini’s funeral, when women ripped off their headscarves in solidarity.

Since then, videos have emerged of women publicly burning their headscarves and cutting their hair to chants such as “Women, life, freedom” and “Death to the dictator,” referring to Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei.

The uprising, by irate Iranians from all walks of life, represents one of the boldest challenges to the Church leadership since the 1979 revolution.

But authorities have tried to quell the protests by downplaying them to world leaders.

Verified footage shows security forces firing tear gas at a residential block in Tehran’s Chitgar neighborhood, where a mass protest was held the night before.

At least 326 people were killed in the protests, CNN reports, more than two dozen of whom are believed to be children.

The commander of Iran's powerful Revolutionary Guards, Hossein Salami, warned protesters that October 29 would be their last day to take to the streets.

The commander of Iran's powerful Revolutionary Guards, Hossein Salami, warned protesters that October 29 would be their last day to take to the streets.

The commander of Iran’s powerful Revolutionary Guards, Hossein Salami, warned protesters that October 29 would be their last day to take to the streets.

In late October, the commander of the country’s Revolutionary Guards, Hossein Salami, warned protesters that October 29 would be their last day to take to the streets.

‘Don’t come out on the street! Today is the last day of the riots,” he said.

According to UN Special Rapporteur on human rights in Iran, Javaid Rehman, police have since arrested more than 14,000 people, with at least 2,000 charged for their alleged involvement in the nationwide protests.

Their trials are now underway and just last week Iran’s Revolutionary Court handed down the death penalty for the first time against an anonymous protester who allegedly set fire to a government building.

The unnamed protester was convicted of “disturbing public order and peace, community, and conspiracy to commit a crime against national security, war and corruption on Earth, war by arson and willful destruction,” according to the state news agency IRNA.

Five others have also been sentenced to prison terms of five to ten years for ‘conspiracy to commit a crime against national security and disturbance of public order and peace’.

Chinese President Xi Jinping was filmed undressing Trudeau at the G20 summit on Wednesday after their earlier conversation was leaked to the press by Canadian government sources

Chinese President Xi Jinping was filmed undressing Trudeau at the G20 summit on Wednesday after their earlier conversation was leaked to the press by Canadian government sources

Chinese President Xi Jinping was filmed undressing Trudeau at the G20 summit on Wednesday after their earlier conversation was leaked to the press by Canadian government sources

The punishment came as world leaders met in Bali for the G20 conference, where Chinese President Xi Jinping was filmed dressing Trudeau after their earlier conversation was leaked to the press by Canadian government sources.

The Canadian sources had reported that Trudeau had raised “serious concerns” with Xi over suspected domestic interference by China during their first talks together in more than three years.

But Xi, who tried to mask his anger with a pointed smile, was filmed by Canadian journalists telling an increasingly clumsy-looking Trudeau, “Everything we discussed yesterday was leaked to the newspapers and it’s not appropriate.”

A stunned Trudeau, running out of words, just nodded as Xi continued his diatribe through a translator. The Chinese president looked emphatically at Trudeau and added, “And that’s not how the conversation was conducted.”

Trudeau, knowing that the details of his meeting with Xi had been leaked by his Canadian government sources, did not address the Chinese president’s concerns and instead gave an unfortunate reply.

“Well, in Canada we believe in a free and open and honest dialogue, which we will continue to have,” he finally said.

“We will continue to look for constructive cooperation, but there will be things we will not agree on.”

As Trudeau spoke, Xi looked frustrated and did not make eye contact with the Canadian Prime Minister.

Xi then smiled broadly and reached out and shook Trudeau’s hand to end the excruciating exchange.

Seemingly stunned by the attack, Trudeau wandered off alone as Xi smiled at the camera.