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Grandmother of baby who died when paramedics took 30 minutes to reach her appears on GMB

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The grandmother of a baby who died after the paramedic took half an hour to answer an emergency call made a heartfelt plea on GMB today.

Paramedics took over half an hour to reach the dying Wyllow-Raine Swinburn in Oxford on September 27 – 23 minutes longer than expected for a Category 1 emergency.

The baby’s desperate family, who was only three days old, spent more than eight minutes on a 999 call after their newborn collapsed, having left the hospital just hours earlier.

Wyllow-Raine’s grandmother Anna-Marie Fisher said on the show today that she believed her granddaughter would be alive today if the paramedics could have arrived earlier.

Paramedics took more than half an hour to reach the dying Wyllow-Raine Swinburn in Oxford on September 27 — 23 minutes longer than expected for a Category 1 emergency. Wyllow-Raine's grandmother Anna-Marie Fisher said she believed her granddaughter would be alive today if the paramedics could have arrived sooner

Paramedics took more than half an hour to reach the dying Wyllow-Raine Swinburn in Oxford on September 27 — 23 minutes longer than expected for a Category 1 emergency. Wyllow-Raine’s grandmother Anna-Marie Fisher said she believed her granddaughter would be alive today if the paramedics could have arrived sooner

The baby's desperate family, who was only three days old in the photo, spent more than eight minutes on a 999 call after their newborn collapsed, having left the hospital just hours earlier.

The baby's desperate family, who was only three days old in the photo, spent more than eight minutes on a 999 call after their newborn collapsed, having left the hospital just hours earlier.

The baby’s desperate family, who was only three days old in the photo, spent more than eight minutes on a 999 call after their newborn collapsed, having left the hospital just hours earlier.

However, the heartbroken grandparents said she didn’t blame the paramedics themselves but called for better management of NHS resources, saying what happened to Wyllow-Raine ‘couldn’t happen again’.

“It’s taking way too long to even answer,” the grandmother said.

‘I don’t blame the paramedics themselves. It has to come from the funding, it has to come from the management,” she continued.

“My son was also performing CPR at Wyllow-Raine as we ran back and forth looking for the ambulance,” she added.

Amelia Pill pictured with her daughter in hospital.  The tragic incident took place hours after the family returned home

Amelia Pill pictured with her daughter in hospital.  The tragic incident took place hours after the family returned home

Amelia Pill pictured with her daughter in hospital. The tragic incident took place hours after the family returned home

It took 8 minutes for emergency services to put through the 999 call and another half hour for the ambulance to arrive after the baby was unresponsive by her mother.

It took 8 minutes for emergency services to put through the 999 call and another half hour for the ambulance to arrive after the baby was unresponsive by her mother.

It took 8 minutes for emergency services to put through the 999 call and another half hour for the ambulance to arrive after the baby was unresponsive by her mother.

‘This must not happen again. I can’t get Wyllow-Raine back, but hopefully we can prevent this from happening again.

‘With all the cuts and things the NHS is going through, what’s going to happen to stop it from happening again?’ she asked.

“It can’t happen again, with no family,” she concluded.

On the set of the show, Dr Hilary, who was present during Anna-Marie’s call, said: “This is a tragic and extremely sad event and I can guarantee that the paramedics and first responders who eventually got there would be devastated themselves.” been. they couldn’t get there any faster.

“The first ambulance was 24 miles away, the second vehicle arrived shortly after, but that was 8 miles away,” he added.

Ed Balls and Susanna Reid, who presented Good Morning Britain today, were deeply moved by the story

Ed Balls and Susanna Reid, who presented Good Morning Britain today, were deeply moved by the story

Ed Balls and Susanna Reid, who presented Good Morning Britain today, were deeply moved by the story

dr.  Hilary said the paramedics who eventually made it to Wyllow-Raine's house must have been devastated not to have arrived sooner

dr.  Hilary said the paramedics who eventually made it to Wyllow-Raine's house must have been devastated not to have arrived sooner

dr. Hilary said the paramedics who eventually made it to Wyllow-Raine’s house must have been devastated not to have arrived sooner

And this is the problem, there just aren’t enough resources in the system to meet the need.

The specialist added that many workers are leaving the ambulance service because of their circumstances.

“The number of incidents involving category 1 calls has increased by 36 percent in the past year,” he explains.

“So demand has increased dramatically, but we don’t have an increase in resources.

“What we do have are people leaving the paramedic because the conditions are so appalling and morale so low. We don’t actually keep staff, we lose them. We urgently need to address this,” he added.

Wyllow-Raine Swinburn’s mother, Amelia Pill, 29, also said she believed emergency services could have saved her child had they come earlier.

Meanwhile, the South Central Ambulance Service insisted they had contacted its local MP and launched an investigation.

Ms. Fisher told the Times: “I’m angry and want answers. I’m not leaving. I don’t blame the paramedics. This is a system error. The blame lies with the government.’

Thousands of people have been affected by long waiting times in ambulances and overcrowded emergency rooms.

NHS waiting lists have risen to record highs amid stark warnings that the ‘horrific’ situation will only get worse this winter.

Official statistics show that 6.8 million patients in England queued for routine hospital treatment in July – the equivalent of one in eight people.

The backlog includes nearly 380,000 people who have been delayed for a year, often in severe pain.

The news comes after NHS services drew up plans to downgrade certain 999 calls to meet rising demand.

In the summer, residents of the West Midlands had to wait an average of just three seconds for an answer, while residents of the South West typically waited one minute and 20 seconds.

But one in 100 callers in Yorkshire had to wait nine minutes and 28 seconds to speak to someone in April, according to the latest data from NHS England.

The South Central and South Western ambulance trusts also caused one in 100 people to wait more than seven minutes that month. An ambulance must be at the most urgent life-threatening emergencies within seven minutes.

The average response time for the most serious calls has risen to more than nine minutes, according to new data.

Wyllow-Raine was born on September 27 in Oxford and was fired two days later.

Her mother found her unresponsive the next day and immediately began CPR, telling a family member to call 999.

Ms Fisher said it took “a while” for someone to pick up the phone, but when they answered a staff member said ambulances were on their way.

Her daughter Amelia was hysterical and started screaming ‘why is nobody coming’.

Paramedics showed up half an hour later and gave the child an adrenaline rush, but she did not recover.

She added: ‘Where was the help? There was no major incident in Oxfordshire that Friday morning at four o’clock.

“We live two minutes from Didcot ambulance station and 10 minutes away is an ambulance station,” Fisher said. “This should never happen to a baby, not to an adult.”

A South Central Ambulance Service spokeswoman said it received the 999 call at 4:38 a.m. “Extreme pressure” meant it took eight minutes to be answered, she said.

The first crew was sent 24 miles away eight minutes after the first call. A second and third response were sent in what the agency said were “extremely challenging conditions” with high demand and poor, foggy weather.

“Our teams are doing their very best. . . but unfortunately there are some instances where, despite their efforts, we are unable to reach those patients as quickly as we would like. We are very sorry that this happened in this case. We immediately launched an ongoing investigation,” the spokeswoman told The Times.