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Children from families who don’t have English as a first language do better at their times tables

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Children from families that do not have English as their first language do better on their tables than their classmates

  • Experts believe that parents from abroad are more positive attitude towards education
  • Test administered in the summer included 25 times table questions, up to 12 x 12
  • The average score for those with a first language of English was 19.4 out of 25
  • But the average for students with a mother tongue other than English was 21.2

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Children whose first language is not English have outperformed their peers in a new times tables test for ages eight and nine.

Data from the Department for Education (DfE) shows that students without English as a first language boomed in maths checking.

The findings give more weight to the theory that families from abroad are more motivated to achieve than those born in the UK.

Despite the language barrier, migrant pupils have repeatedly outperformed their peers in a range of other educational measures.

Four in 10 are considering reducing the curriculum and almost all (98 percent) said their school or college will have to make cuts this year, the next few years or both

Data from the Department for Education (DfE) shows that students without English as a first language boomed in maths checking

Experts believe that parents from other countries have a more positive attitude towards education and a more ambitious outlook than British families.

The test, administered over the summer, included 25 times table questions, up to 12 x 12, with a maximum of six seconds to answer each question.

The average score for those with a first language of English was 19.4 out of 25, while the average score for students with a mother tongue other than English was 21.2.

For all students, the overall average score was 19.8 out of 25.

More than a quarter – 27 percent – of all students passed.

London was the best performing region in the country, with an average score of 20.9.

Data from the Department for Education (DfE) shows that students without English as a first language boomed in maths checking

Data from the Department for Education (DfE) shows that students without English as a first language boomed in maths checking

The test, administered over the summer, included 25 times table questions, up to 12 x 12, with a maximum of six seconds to answer each question. The average score for those with a first language of English was 19.4 out of 25

The Southwest was the worst performing region, with an average score of 19.1.

It is the first results publication after the assessment becomes legal in 2021/22.

The DfE said it will provide teachers with standardized information to help identify pupils who may need additional support.

Education Secretary Gillian Keegan said: ‘When I was in primary school I was lucky enough to learn my times tables, but for many children the luck of the draw was dependent on their school.

“It’s a skill I’ve used all my life, whether it’s on international business or a trip to the grocery store. That is why we ensure that every child leaves school today with that vital foundation.

“The very first results for our new national multiplication table check… are a valuable benchmark for us to build on and help our brilliant teachers provide targeted support to the children who need it most.”